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A new art show will be held at the Mendocino Co-op in Mendocino during March 2012 to benifit SRA. 
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“Oceans 17” - MEA Working for Salmon

A Benefit Exhibit for the Salmon Restoration Association

What a dry year we are having!  How will the salmon get upstream when there hasn’t been enough rain to wash the sand bars away?  That was the big concern for fish biologists until the first big rain in late January, very late in the migrating season.  And then the Coho salmon rushed up the local rivers and streams in numbers greater than the past few years.  At the Pudding Creek dam 300 were counted during the first flush.

The adult Coho migrants of this season went to sea as yearlings three years ago.  The intervening years have had “La Nina” weather conditions which bring changes in rain patterns, but also result in an upwelling of deep marine water which brings abundant nutrients to surface water.  From the ocean-going fish’s perspective, these rich deep waters provided excellent conditions for growth and success.

These adult Cohos had been waiting in the bays and just offshore along our coast since the late autumn, waiting to get far upstream to the protected tributaries of the creeks and rivers.  Many of them were gradually changing from their silvery marine coloration to the brilliant red and green of spawning adults.  But they couldn’t get upstream because every year during the dry months sand bars build up at the mouths of the creeks and rivers which bar them from their annual migration.  If they could not get upstream, they would have died or spawned at the mouth of the river where their young would not have had a chance of survival.  But finally a big storm came, washed out the sand bars enough that the rush upstream could begin.

Some of the streams they went to had much more favorable conditions for spawning than a few years ago.  Scientists now believe in an “if you build it, they will come” approach to improving the Coho populations of our coast;  instead of trying to farm-raise baby salmon, they advise that the streams be rehabilitated to conditions closer to those present here before the great timber harvests started.  Many environmental organizations and some land owners and timber companies still operating here have been working each summer to restore the stream beds to good spawning conditions.

The Salmon Restoration Association has been a leader in these efforts and has helped bring many of the stakeholders together to find solutions to the problems of habitat restoration.

The 17 members of the Mendocino Eco Artists (MEA) are proud to be supporters of Salmon Restoration Association (SRA) and will be presenting a benefit exhibit of nature-inspired fine art at the Mendocino Artists’ Co-op during the month of March.  The member artists will donate 30% of the proceeds from this exhibit to the SRA.  The show will open with a special celebration on March, 10, from 3 PM until sunset at the gallery upstairs near the west end of Main Street in Mendocino.  Please join us for this special event.

The MEA members are professional artists who live, work, and draw their creative inspiration from this beautiful place.  This year the group includes Juriaan Blok, Karen Bowers, Maeve Croghan, Eleanor Harvey, John Hewitt, Julie Higgins, JoAnn Hagerty Humphrey, Joe Janisch, Debra Beck Lennox, Suzi Marquess Long, Keith Middlesworth, Jim Moorehead, Deborah Nord, Janis Porter, Bob Rhoades, Nick Schwartz, and Cynthia Crocker Scott.

The Salmon Restoration Association is dedicated to restoring the spawning beds for the native Coho salmon.  In addition, the SRA has a mission to help educate the public - youths and adults - about the biology of our region.  SRA supports environmental education programs for Fort Bragg Middle School, Jughandle Nature Center and Mendocino High School students, and they host public forums on marine environmental issues.

We may never get back to the salmon runs of over 20,000 fish per season per stream which were common before our coast became the lumber source for the west coast, but we can do our best to make it possible for the Coho to thrive once again in Mendocino County.  Restoring habitat will also improve conditions for all the other plants and animals which depend on the stream habitat as well.  The fishermen of the coast will once again be able to work in our local waters, and someday the diners at SRA’s July event, ”The World’s Largest Salmon Barbeque,” can once again eat local salmon!  

The Mendocino Eco Artists are dedicated to helping SRA increase public awareness of the threats to the ecological balance of our region by raising funds to support their projects. 

Please see www.mendocinoecoartists.org and www.salmonrestoration.com for further information.

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Mendocino Eco Artists

Creatively Supporting the Environment

The Stanford Inn is hosting this exhibit of artwork by the members of the Mendocino Eco Artists from June 1 – August 28.  The members of MEA are very grateful to Jeff and Joan Stanford for their continuing support of many programs and projects that improve our community.  MEA is very honored to be able to share members’ artwork in the Stanford’s beautiful venue. 

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of all artwork in this delightful show will benefit the Salmon Restoration Association and thus help restore Coho Salmon habitat along our coast and its rivers and streams.

SRA habitat restoration projects for 2011 – 2012 are focused on Big River and its tributary creeks and streams.  Big River flows past the Stanford Inn and opens into Mendocino Bay.

What is MEA?

Mendocino Eco Artists (MEA) is an organization of artists who have the common goal of applying their talents to help conserve and restore the natural environment in our area.  The members are professional painters and sculptors who live, work, and draw their creative inspiration from this beautiful place.

The mission of MEA is to form partnerships with local environmental groups, and through joint projects, use the members’ artwork to help increase public awareness of the threats to the ecological balance, and to raise funds to support their projects. 

The MEA members are Juriaan Blok, Maeve Croghan, Eleanor Harvey, John Hewitt, Julie Higgins, JoAnn Hagerty Humphrey, Joe Janisch, Debra Beck Lennox, Suzi Marquess Long, Keith Middlesworth, Jim Moorehead, Deborah Nord, Janis Porter, Bob Rhoades, Nick Schwartz, and Cynthia Crocker Scott

MEA and the Salmon Restoration Association

MEA formed a partnership with the Salmon Restoration Association (SRA) to help promote public awareness of the conditions of local salmon habitats and to help fund stream restoration projects. 

The Salmon Restoration Association members are fishermen, biologists, and concerned businesses and citizens of the area.  The SRA and its associated environmental groups work to clean up local the streams and creeks and restore them to healthy habitats where Coho salmon can spawn and their young can mature until time to return to the ocean.  

The SRA is well-known for its major annual fund-raising event, “The World’s Largest Salmon Barbeque” which is held on the July 4th weekend every year.  The event earns thousands of dollars for stream restoration projects.

www.mendocinoecoartists.org - www.salmonrestoration.com




Salmon Film Festival

The first-ever Salmon Film Festival, co-sponsored by the Salmon Restoration Association, the City of Ft. Bragg and North Coast Brewing Company, takes place July 1st and 2nd in Ft. Bragg Town Hall.


The Salmon Film Festival is held in conjunction with the 40th Annual World’s Largest Salmon Barbeque in the Noyo Harbor, a major fundraising event held by the Salmon Restoration Association to support local salmon education and conservation programs
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The 
first day of the festival is timed to coincide with the City of Ft. Bragg's monthly "First Friday" downtown art walk, and runs from 5:00 pm - 8:00 pm. 
The second day of the festival, scheduled to run from 11:00 am - 5:00 pm, occurs simultaneously with the Salmon Barbeque, and is timed to allow barbeque attendees plenty of time to enjoy their salmon meal and still catch plenty of films.


The Salmon Film Festival will show films focusing on salmon culture, ecology, and conservation. Several short and feature-length films will show community-based restoration projects and dam removals, Native American connections to salmon, the dangers of farmed salmon, and beautiful footage of salmon ecology throughout the Pacific Northwest.
Filmmakers, educators, scientists and local experts will accompany the films and lead the audience in question and answer sessions.Film updates, programs, links to featured films and information are available on the festival website: http://salmonfilmfestival.wordpress.com/


Fort Bragg’s annual celebration of the glorious migratory salmon turns 40 this year, attracting thousands of visitors.

The World’s Largest Salmon Barbecue in Fort Bragg’s Noyo Harbor on Saturday July 2 is more than just a day of live music, delicious marinated barbecued salmon and great microbrews and local wines.

 

The event, which benefits the Salmon Restoration Association, funds key educational efforts and watershed work in the campaign to save flagging king and silver salmon populations.

 

A ticket for $25 buys a giant plate of salmon, salad, corn on the cob and garlic bread, along with live music and dancing.  There is award-winning microbrew from North Coast Brewing, fair trade coffee from Thanksgiving Coffee and wine from many local vintners.  Cowlicks ice cream is served.

 

There are many other Mendocino Coast events to enjoy on the 4th of July weekend, including Friday night fireworks, Saturday’s world-famous and often wacky Mendocino Village parade at noon., The World’s Largest Salmon Barbecue provides shuttle service from College of the Redwoods parking lot to South Noyo Harbor from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. in South Noyo Harbor. Fort Bragg's Lions, Rotary, Knights of Columbus, and Soroptimist  clubs all provide teams of volunteers.  Harvest Market, Fort Bragg Feed and Pet, North Coast Brewing, Thanksgiving Coffee and many others make important annual contributions.

 

The World’s Largest Salmon Barbecue was started in 1973 by commercial fishermen hoping to find ways to restore salmon populations.  It has been a fixture in Fort Bragg ever since. Advance tickets, priced at $20, are available at Harvest Market in the Boatyard Center in Fort Bragg.

 

The Salmon Restoration Association’s annual fundraiser already funds many key educational efforts and watershed work in the campaign to save flagging king and silver salmon populations.  Proceeds from the barbecue events over the past three years have gone primarily to projects on the Big, Noyo and Eel River watersheds.  The SRA also funds an educational/work program where Fort Bragg Middle School students from the Math, Engineering and Science Achievement Class restore Otis Johnson Wilderness Park, whose watershed includes two wild creeks.  That program is co-sponsored by Jughandle Creek Nature Center and the City of Fort Bragg.

 

Salmon is purchased locally through Caito Fisheries, a business being run  in South Noyo Harbor by the great grandchildren of the founders. Caito locates fish at the lowest price and always donates time, equipment and freezer space to the World’s Largest Salmon Barbecue. Fish purchased by Caito have traditionally come from the state of Washington, as even in the heyday of salmon fishing the California salmon Harvest was just getting started in early July, hitting its peak at the end of summer and in early fall.  Washington’s fish return earlier.


With high hopes for salmon fishing this year, the SRA expects to get some donated and perhaps some confiscated fish. Anyone wishing to donate fish can contact Mike Williamson at
Redwood Liquors, 112 S Main Street at 707-964-9334

 

Contact SRA at janischbythesea@comcast.net or www.salmonrestoration.com.

 

To volunteer or for more information call SRA president Joe Janisch   at 707-962-0548

 

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MEA Artists Still Working For Salmon

2010 was an exciting first year for the Mendocino Eco Artists (MEA).  The artists earned nearly $3,000 for the Salmon Restoration Association (SRA), the great group that brings you the “World’s Largest Salmon Barbeque” every July.

 The MEA was active in numerous community events – parades, fairs, a habitat tour, exhibits - throughout the summer and fall and shared the profits from their art sales at a major exhibit at the Mendocino Art Center.  Member John Hewitt donated a stunning pastel painting, “Salmon Spawn,” as the raffle prize which earned $1,931; the lucky ticket was held by Ann Marie Mitroff of Dobbs Ferry, New York, who is thrilled with her new painting.

The Mendocino Eco Artists are beginning their second year with “Visions from the Coast,” a new exhibit of wonderful, nature-inspired art work to support the SRA at the Mendocino Artists’ Co-op on Main Street during the month of March. All member artists will donate 30% of the proceeds from this and other MEA art exhibits to the SRA.  The show will open on March 2, and there will be a special celebration on March, 12, from 3 PM until sunset.  More exhibits and activities are planned for the SRA-MEA partnership through August of this year.

The MEA members are professional artists who live, work, and draw their creative inspiration from this beautiful place.  This year the group includes Juriaan Blok, Maeve Croghan, Erin Dertner, Eleanor Harvey, John Hewitt, Julie Higgins, JoAnn Hagerty Humphrey, Joe Janisch, Debra Beck Lennox, Suzi Marquess Long, Keith Middlesworth, Jim Moorehead, Deborah Nord, Janis Porter, Bob Rhoades, Nick Schwartz, and Cynthia Crocker Scott.

The Salmon Restoration Association is dedicated to restoring the spawning beds for the native Coho salmon.  During the early years of logging on the Mendocino coast, most of the local streams and rivers were scoured smooth and the erosion from the clear-cut hillsides filled the streams with silt and decaying debris.  These conditions made reproduction extremely difficult for the Coho “tribes” of the Mendocino coast.  As a result, the salmon runs of 20,000 – 30,000 fish per season per stream are now down to under 1,000 fish each.

If the spawning streams can be restored to something like the original condition with deep pools and shallow rapids, the Coho population has a chance to increase greatly.  Restoring habitat will also improve conditions for all the other plants and animals which depend on the stream habitat as well.  The fishermen of the coast will once again be able to work in our local waters, and someday, the diners at ”World’s Largest Salmon Barbeque” can, once again eat local salmon!  

In October MEA and SRA hosted a tour of an area that had been restored during the summer and are planning for a return visit to see the results.  Stream restoration projects on tributaries of Mendocino’s Big River are the focus of the current fund-raising efforts. 

In addition to salmon habitat restoration, the SRA is dedicated to helping educate the public -  youths and adults -  about the biology of our region.  They fund education programs for school groups through the Jughandle Nature Center and they host public forums on marine environmental issues.

The Mendocino Eco Artists are dedicated to helping SRA and other environmental groups to increase public awareness of the threats to the ecological balance of our region and to raising funds to support their projects. 

Please see www.mendocinoecoartists.org
 
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